Ms. Gonzalez's website

For my AP Government, Honors Modern World History and Modern World History students.

May 19, 2014 at 6:05pm
506 notes
Reblogged from poorrichardsnews
poorrichardsnews:

170 years of American history in one gif. 
(h/t Weasel Zippers)

poorrichardsnews:

170 years of American history in one gif. 

(h/t Weasel Zippers)

(via edukaition)

2:54pm
1,027 notes
Reblogged from powermovesonly

Really trust in the universe to take care of what you need. Rather than stressing or worrying about the future, just trust in the unfolding of the moment.

— Mark Hyman (via i-nimit-able)

(Source: powermovesonly, via meditationsinwonderland)

May 16, 2014 at 1:56pm
545 notes
Reblogged from stereoculturesociety

stereoculturesociety:

DailyPBO: The President @ The 9/11 Museum Opening

Photos of the somber opening ceremony for the 9/11 Museum at Ground Zero. Click here for more on the dedication (and link to Obama’s speech).

(via smartgirlsattheparty)

May 14, 2014 at 11:54am
23 notes
Reblogged from politico
politico:

Must read before tonight’s primaries in WVa and NE: How Big a Wave? The big question for 2014: Will we see a GOP ripple … or a tsunami?
 

politico:

Must read before tonight’s primaries in WVa and NE: How Big a Wave? The big question for 2014: Will we see a GOP ripple … or a tsunami?

 

May 8, 2014 at 2:09pm
41,696 notes
Reblogged from if-dementors-were-pink
 

for every high school student studying for ap tests:
here are the dates
studying tips if you need help
make a to do list that actually works
block distracting websites
listen to calming sounds
go to a coffee shop to work in
make some healthy study snacks
motivate yourself to hit the books
learn pretty much everything
cram packets for every ap test
learn test taking strategies
calm down if you’re stressed
what to do when your day sucks
pull an all nighter and still be functional
be prepared the day of the test!

 

for every high school student studying for ap tests:

(via youreallyshouldbestudying)

May 7, 2014 at 11:27am
624 notes
Reblogged from ourpresidents
ourpresidents:

The Defeat of German Nazi Forces
On this day in 1945, German General Alfred Jodl signed an unconditional surrender at Reims, France.
This photo was taken in the War Room of the Allied Supreme Headquarters. On General Jodl’s left is General Admiral Von Friedenburg of the German Navy, and on his right is Major Wilhelm Oxenius of the German general staff.   May 7, 1945.  U.S. Army.
from the Eisenhower Library 

ourpresidents:

The Defeat of German Nazi Forces

On this day in 1945, German General Alfred Jodl signed an unconditional surrender at Reims, France.

This photo was taken in the War Room of the Allied Supreme Headquarters. On General Jodl’s left is General Admiral Von Friedenburg of the German Navy, and on his right is Major Wilhelm Oxenius of the German general staff.   May 7, 1945.  U.S. Army.

from the Eisenhower Library 

(Source: facebook.com, via pbsthisdayinhistory)

May 2, 2014 at 12:14pm
674 notes
Reblogged from ilovecharts
ilovecharts:

Time Line of American execution by state

ilovecharts:

Time Line of American execution by state

April 29, 2014 at 5:31pm
784 notes
Reblogged from vicemag
vicemag:

Is America Finally Ready to Abandon the Electoral College and Embrace the Popular Vote
US presidential elections are frequently the butt of jokes worldwide, and deservedly so. Between the eye-popping fundraising totals, the awkward pandering to billionaires, and the shameless jockeying for the support of key interest groups in weird places like Iowa and New Hampshire, there’s a lot to hate.
Much of this can be blamed on the electoral college. Instead of simply counting votes nationwide and giving the Oval Office to the guy or gal with the most ballots, America holds 50 statewide elections, then awards points called “electors” to the winner of each election. It’s a confusing system that makes winning 51 percent of the votes in California more than ten times as valuable as winning 100 percent of the votes in Nebraska, and gives special status to the few swing states that could go either way. Standard practice nowadays is for candidates to camp out in the dozen or so of these key states, which enjoy special status because their cities are surrounded by dense, conservative suburbs that balance out the votes of liberal urbanites. This means millions of voters are effectively stuck on the margins of political life, and thanks to our system we risk disaster every four years.
George W. Bush’s incredible non-victory in 2000—which came, of course, thanks to an assist from his dad’s pals on the Supreme Court—may be the the most recent example, but it doesn’t even scratch the surface of the twisted intrigue that the electoral college has encouraged over the years. After the 1876 election saw the electors go one way and the popular vote the other, the “compromise” that was reached set the stage for a flood of Jim Crow laws and racial terrorism into the American South, as a key concession from the Republicans was to remove occupying federal troops that had been in the former Confederate states since the Civil War.
Continue

vicemag:

Is America Finally Ready to Abandon the Electoral College and Embrace the Popular Vote

US presidential elections are frequently the butt of jokes worldwide, and deservedly so. Between the eye-popping fundraising totals, the awkward pandering to billionaires, and the shameless jockeying for the support of key interest groups in weird places like Iowa and New Hampshire, there’s a lot to hate.

Much of this can be blamed on the electoral college. Instead of simply counting votes nationwide and giving the Oval Office to the guy or gal with the most ballots, America holds 50 statewide elections, then awards points called “electors” to the winner of each election. It’s a confusing system that makes winning 51 percent of the votes in California more than ten times as valuable as winning 100 percent of the votes in Nebraska, and gives special status to the few swing states that could go either way. Standard practice nowadays is for candidates to camp out in the dozen or so of these key states, which enjoy special status because their cities are surrounded by dense, conservative suburbs that balance out the votes of liberal urbanites. This means millions of voters are effectively stuck on the margins of political life, and thanks to our system we risk disaster every four years.

George W. Bush’s incredible non-victory in 2000—which came, of course, thanks to an assist from his dad’s pals on the Supreme Court—may be the the most recent example, but it doesn’t even scratch the surface of the twisted intrigue that the electoral college has encouraged over the years. After the 1876 election saw the electors go one way and the popular vote the other, the “compromise” that was reached set the stage for a flood of Jim Crow laws and racial terrorism into the American South, as a key concession from the Republicans was to remove occupying federal troops that had been in the former Confederate states since the Civil War.

Continue

(via newsweek)

1:53pm
0 notes

Read pgs. 645- the top of 651

April 10, 2014 at 3:55pm
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Haunting Photos Bring The Great War Back To Life →

Hi all! I thought these World War I photos were really cool!